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A playground of past and present

A playground of past and present, where a collective of Singaporean experiences await. Yum Sing! is “a play on ‘Yam Seng’, a traditional Cantonese term for ‘cheers’. This celebratory spirit is what lives in our philosophy, and is what we’re here to share with you.

Celebration Bottle Celebration Bottle

Located at Clarke Quay, Yum Sing! is dedicated to elevating and sharing delicacies of Singapore with the world in the most authentic way. It’s our mission to serve up iconic local dishes loved by locals and travellers alike. With a variety of hawker favourites in sharing plates, our combination of the finest ingredients bring you the quality of flavours, aromas and spices of Singapore.

A platform for unceasing celebrations

But it’s not just the food that’s authentic. Whet your appetite for local history and culture with traditions and performances that pay homage to both past and present. Step into our eclectic space and let the juxtaposition of old and new send you into the mood of the swinging 60’s.

Yum Sing! is here to place you in the centre of what it means to eat, drink, and party in Singapore. So gather your family, friends, or make new ones – and immerse yourself in our lively space for hours of happy and nights of yum. Are you ready to Yum Sing! the night away?

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Celebrate the Singapore Way

Lion Dance – King of the Jungle

It’s a lion like you’ve never seen before. And it dances! The Lion Dance is performed during the Chinese New Year (CNY), at festivals or big occasions to bring good fortune and chase away evil spirits. It is said to be associated with the legends of Nian, a bestial creature that was frightened off by villagers loudly banging on drums on the eve of CNY. Inside the oversized head and colourful lion costume are two persons who perform different stances ranging from happiness, anger, fright, merry-making, suspicion, drunkenness, sleep and wakefulness. Here at Yum Sing!, our resident lion will dance a dance of fortune daily just for you as you enter our doors.

Lo Hei – Toss like a boss

Lo implies “tossing up good fortune” and Hei means “to rise”, a reference to a prosperous business and thus its popularity with businessmen during the new year celebrations. Lo Hei is performed with the dish called Yu Sheng, which comprises raw fish slices and a myriad of condiments, shredded vegetables and candied fruits. It’s deemed an auspicious dish because of the meanings behind its ingredients. Yu is a homonym for “fish” and “abundance”, while sheng means both “raw” and “life”. The higher you toss, the better your fortunes. And yes, it is proudly invented on our shores by four chefs known as the “Four Heavenly Kings”. Usually served only during Chinese New Year, you can have it every day at Yum Sing! How’s that for everyday luck!

Yam Seng – Cheers to you

“Yam Seng,” or “cheers” in Cantonese, means “drink to victory”. This rowdy cheer is traditionally done at wedding dinners where the bride and groom’s families are invited onto the stage and everyone will raise their glasses high and shout “yam seng”, often dragging the “yam” for as long as their lungs can hold out, followed by raucous “seng” to complete the toast. This loud and celebratory cheer is also practised at company functions, Chinese New Year, and any other celebratory occasions. At Yum Sing! You can join us for a “yam seng” every night as you toast with drinks from our bar including Yum Sling, or Kaya Toast cocktail.

Celebrate the Singapore Way

Lion Dance – King of the Jungle

It’s a lion like you’ve never seen before. And it dances! The Lion Dance is performed during the Chinese New Year (CNY), at festivals or big occasions to bring good fortune and chase away evil spirits. It is said to be associated with the legends of Nian, a bestial creature that was frightened off by villagers loudly banging on drums on the eve of CNY. Inside the oversized head and colourful lion costume are two persons who perform different stances ranging from happiness, anger, fright, merry-making, suspicion, drunkenness, sleep and wakefulness. Here at Yum Sing!, our resident lion will dance a dance of fortune daily just for you as you enter our doors.

Celebrate the Singapore Way

Lo Hei – Toss like a boss

Lo implies “tossing up good fortune” and Hei means “to rise”, a reference to a prosperous business and thus its popularity with businessmen during the new year celebrations. Lo Hei is performed with the dish called Yu Sheng, which comprises raw fish slices and a myriad of condiments, shredded vegetables and candied fruits. It’s deemed an auspicious dish because of the meanings behind its ingredients. Yu is a homonym for “fish” and “abundance”, while sheng means both “raw” and “life”. The higher you toss, the better your fortunes. And yes, it is proudly invented on our shores by four chefs known as the “Four Heavenly Kings”. Usually served only during Chinese New Year, you can have it every day at Yum Sing! How’s that for everyday luck!

Celebrate the Singapore Way

Yam Seng – Cheers to you

“Yam Seng,” or “cheers” in Cantonese, means “drink to victory”. This rowdy cheer is traditionally done at wedding dinners where the bride and groom’s families are invited onto the stage and everyone will raise their glasses high and shout “yam seng”, often dragging the “yam” for as long as their lungs can hold out, followed by raucous “seng” to complete the toast. This loud and celebratory cheer is also practised at company functions, Chinese New Year, and any other celebratory occasions. At Yum Sing! You can join us for a “yam seng” every night as you toast with drinks from our bar including Yum Sling, or Kaya Toast cocktail.

Experience the New World, 1960’s style

Step into a space inspired by the new world amusement park in the 1960’s. See how we bring the past back to life and reinvent the new world.

Opened in 1932, the New World Amusement Park was one of Singapore’s earliest amusement parks located on a 6-acre tract along Jalan Besar. The other worlds, Great World and Happy World followed after. The amusement parks were created to provide entertainment to the masses. It was a popular night-time recreation spot and a magnet for people from all walks of life, from families, friends, labourers to European Merchants and even Malayan Royalty.

Interior Design Inspiration

Carousel Horse

Taking centre-stage in our theme and décor is the carousel or merry-go-round, which represents one of many recreational activities on the New World fairground, besides an olden day ferris-wheel, a Ghost Train ride and Bumper cars.

Ticketing Booth

Greeting you as you enter, is our ticketing booth, a recreation of the booths that were common within the amusement parks of the day. Back then, for just 10-cents, you’ll get an admission ticket. New World Park had a number of venues for performances. The most popular cinema was the Grand Cinema (大光) for Chinese movies. State Cinema was screening mainly movies. Stages for operas were also a prominent feature, with the Sunshine Stage said to be its biggest theatre.

Food

Besides entertainment, food during that era was said to be EXCELLENT. Of all three worlds, Great World Amusement Park was also acclaimed for its collection of famous food places. Be it restaurants, street stalls or even hawkers walking around selling food, there was always something scrumptious available for everyone. In fact, the restaurants inside were common spots for major events and wedding banquets.